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Longform + Features

 
Pamela Pena, 25, with her niece Vistoria Cronel, 5. Pamela crosses the border at least once a week to study dentistry. She was born in San Diego but lives in Tijuana. Alexia Webster

Pamela Pena, 25, with her niece Vistoria Cronel, 5. Pamela crosses the border at least once a week to study dentistry. She was born in San Diego but lives in Tijuana. Alexia Webster

THE BORDER COMMUTERS | The Outline - Sept 8, 2017

"On the Mexican side of San Ysidro Port of Entry on the border of California, traffic starts backing up long before the sun rises. Commuters shift their gears into park; lower their seatbacks for pre-dawn naps; buy Mexican grilled corn or burritos from street vendors; and listen to roving musicians strumming traditional norteño ballads — anything to help pass the time as they wait to enter the United States for the start of the American work day."

Read full article here

LI-ANNE DIAS for WIRED Backchannel

LI-ANNE DIAS for WIRED Backchannel

HOW WECHAT SPREADS RUMORS, REAFFIRMS BIAS, AND HELPED ELECT TRUMP | WIRED - Backchannel 4.20.2017

"WeChat’s design does not make it easy to fight biases or fake news. Information on the platform spreads quickly within and between WeChat groups, but the sources of information — and therefore their verifiability — are de-emphasized, to the extent that sources are almost completely ignored. As a result, credibility defaults to whomever shared the information last, and whether he or she can be believed. The litmus test for truthfulness has moved from, “is this argument supported by evidence?” to, “is this argument shared by someone whose judgment I trust?” Read full article

Mural in Kandahar City advertising the short-lived "Peace Stories-Kandahar" mobile reporting project

Mural in Kandahar City advertising the short-lived "Peace Stories-Kandahar" mobile reporting project

AFGHANISTAN'S 'SNEAKERNET' PROVIDES OFFLINE ACCESS TO DIGITAL CONTENT | Nikkei Asian Review (Print/Online) - Sept. 2016

The crowded central market of Kota-e-Sangi, in Kabul, is a place where you can buy anything -- fresh meat, fruit and vegetables; cheap goods from China and Pakistan; even an extra pair of hands from the day laborers who line the streets each morning.

In addition to physical goods, Kota-e-Sangi has become a central node for the "Sneakernet," the offline transfer of digital content -- games, TV shows, movies, music, apps and photographs -- that exists in locales around the world with scant access to the internet. Read online